Stephanie-Casey - BFF Isn't Always the Case

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Welcome to GET YOUR S!*T TOGETHER! I am Maggie Steele - I am a life coach for teens and young adults and the author of "How I Got My S!*t Together." I believe that every single person, no matter what their past experiences may be, is capable of realizing their dreams, being successful, and finding fulfilment in their life. So give yourself a clean slate, be the person you want to be, and start living the life you want to live! For more info, check out my site: www.TheLifeCoachforTeens.com.

Stephanie-Casey - BFF Isn't Always the Case

Stephanie and Casey had been best friends since they first met in the second grade.  In fact, the two girls were so close that people would often think they were sisters.  Now it seemed that Stephanie was not just losing a friend, but a member of her very own family. 

The two girls had been tight as ever at the end of eighth grade however, their friendship was not enduring the social challenges and complicated situations of freshman year.  Casey was suddenly less interested in hanging out with Stephanie and more interested in becoming friends with the other, more popular girls.  Casey had also developed breasts and was getting a lot more attention from the boys in their class than she had the year before.  Stephanie, on the other hand, was still stick thin and considered to be flat and boyish. 

To make matters worse, lately, Casey was completely ignoring Stephanie.  The two of them hardly even made eye contact in the hallways.  It was clear that the friendship was disintegrating into nothing and that Casey’s new friends were her priority; not Stephanie.

We are constantly changing as we grow up and that process continues throughout adulthood.  Sometimes the people we had gotten along with in middle school don’t enjoy the same things that we do in high school.  Other times, some sort of event pulls us apart or puts tension on the friendship.  It’s not easy to lose a friend and it’s especially difficult if you’ve known and cared about that person for a long time.  If you feel like Stephanie does, here are a few things you can do:

~ Acknowledge that you and your best friend have grown apart.  Sometimes it’s difficult to do, but if you’re the only one trying to salvage the relationship, you’ll end up being even more hurt in the long run. 

~ Seek out new friends who share your interests and values.  It can be a challenge to meet new people and make new friends, but if you step out of your comfort zone and are friendly, you’ll end up attracting like-minded people who value your friendship.

~ Join a club or take part in an activity outside of school.  You’ll meet new people and it will help you focus on something fun instead of dwelling on the uncomfortable situation at school.

~ Remember that this is temporary and it will soon pass.  Your feelings will eventually subside and you’ll end up in a much better place.  Picture yourself a few months down the road with new, loyal, fantastic friends and I promise it will happen. 

Copyright © 2012 by Maggie Steele